Monday, 17 April 2017

Breast Milk Protein - why is it so important for Child Development?

Breast Milk Protein - why is it so important for Child Development?

*Disclosure: advertorial feature

As an Early Years specialist, the brain development of young children from birth to five has not only been a focal point for me as a Teacher and as a Parent, but it is also a subject I am incredibly passionate about.

I am sure that many of us have come across the social memes and quotes on this subject explaining how optimal brain development happens in the first five years of life - and the opportunities we give our children in those five years will impact how the next 80 turn out. It is absolutely true. This can feel like a huge responsibility, and is one of the reasons I always endeavour to provide fun and exciting Learning Through Play opportunities wherever possible.

It starts way before this though - good nutrition and a healthy body are also absolutely critical to brain development and learning, and this is most important in the first 1000 days of life - from pregnancy right through to their 2nd birthday – helping to build their nutritional foundation for life. Remember that saying 'my body is a temple' ? well so is theirs - only they rely on you as a parent or carer to provide them with the good stuff they need in order to develop. Protein being especially important, as it gives them the building blocks they need to develop and grow.

From what we choose to put inside our bodies during pregnancy, to the decisions we make about their nutrition as they grow, it all matters. It is comforting to know therefore, that the breast milk protein available to our children in those early days can play such a key and important part in child development. SMA® Nutrition has developed a useful infographic which shows some of the benefits of breast milk protein within the first 1000 days:

Infographic on the importance of protein in the first 1000 days from SMA Nutrition

The scientific bit about breast milk protein:

Protein makes up a large component of the human body and is vital for a healthy digestive and immune system, to build muscle, bone and blood, and to form enzymes and hormones. From mid pregnancy to about two years of age (those first 1000 days!), it plays a huge part in brain development.

The human body needs 20 amino acids, often called the body’s building blocks, and this is what protein is made of. We, therefore, get these amino acids from eating and drinking foods with protein. Some of these amino acids cannot be made by our bodies, so we must have a steady supply from our diet. Breast milk protein is rich in these essential amino acids, helping your child to grow and develop. 


ZTC1818a/04/17 SMA® Nutrition UK
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16 comments:

  1. This is why I exclusively expressed for as long as a could for Little M. I wanted to give her the best start I possibly could. Hoping to be able to breastfeed 'properly' if we have another baby.

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    1. good luck Jules, my sister did the same - it's hard work expressing exclusively,well done you x

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  2. I've been exclusively breastfeeding my Son since birth and with a week before he turns 14 months we're still going strong! Nothing like Mother's Milk but appreciate that some are not able to breastfeed due to low/now supply. #KCACOLS

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    1. good for you Danielle - yes I totally agree, it can be hard to get the hang of it in those early days and low supply can make it even harder x

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  3. I knew this but I didn't realise it was 5 years. Although I think I'll always be conscious of what goes into his body as much as I am my own.

    Always good to be reminded 😊

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  4. That is such a useful diagram showing the importance of protein for your baby. I breastfed both of girls to try and give them the best start in life x

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  5. Breast milk is an amazing thing and so cool that it provides exactly what our little ones need. Mich x

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  6. Breastfeeding is great, but it can be damn hard at times. It was one of my greatest challenges, but I am pleased to say also one of my greatest achievements. Pen x #KCACOLS

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    1. im totally with you on that - i breastfed Arthur for 26 months and i think he only stopped because i was pregnant....morning sickness and breastfeeding were def my hardest moments x

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  7. This is a great infographic. :) Breast milk is absolutely amazing stuff! Ray xx

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  8. human bodies never fail to amaze me!

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  9. Breast milk is amazing. I'm still breastfeeding my baby girl at nearly 15 months x

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  10. It's amazing what it can do. Sadly I only managed 9 weeks breast feeding my little one but it just simply wasn't enough for her there. One of the hardest and guiltiest days of my life when I had to stop.
    Thanks for linking to #ablogginggoodtime and don't forget to join us again this week!

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  11. Mother's milk is best but breastfeeding isn't easy. I just hope the mothers who didn't manage to be sucessful at it don't feel like they've set up their children for failiure. I certainly didn't do it for 2 years and I don't think many mother do. We're all doing our best. Thanks so much for linking up at #KCACOLS. Hope you come back again next Sunday

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  12. I struggled both times with breastfeeding, but it is so important to try! #kcacols

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  13. I really struggled with breastfeeding my boys and ended up expressing my milk for the first 8 weeks or instead and it was really tough. I think no matter how you end up feeding your child it's important to know that we are all doing our best. #KCACOLS

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