Wednesday, 16 January 2019

Teenage suicide - what are the warning signs and how can you help?

Last month, the lives of some of my closest family were changed forever as one of the younger members, Quinn, took her own life a few short weeks before Christmas. Quinn was just 17.

teenage suicide - what are the warning signs and how can you help

The passing of anyone you know and care about feels like a huge loss, but when they leave this life by choice, the “what ifs” feel louder, the responsibility feels heavier and the ability to make sense of it all feels so out of reach. We know we aren’t to blame, and yet we still can’t help but wonder if we could have done more...


Teenage suicide - what are the warning signs and how can you help?



The number of teenage suicides in the UK has risen by 15% in the last year alone (office of national statistics - ONS) and depression is the biggest cause of ill health amongst teenagers around the world (BBC).

We know that talking about mental health issues, although less of a 'taboo' topic these days thanks to campaigns such as #timetotalk and #worldmentalhealthday, can still be a tricky conversation to have. 
 Some people worry that by opening up the conversation around suicide, they could be inadvertently putting the idea of suicide in their minds. The advice is still to talk openly and honestly about suicide, and research carried out by the charity for the prevention of young suicide, PAPYRUS , shows that talking about suicide does not give people ideas. Rather, you would be creating a scenario where you are making them aware that it is okay to talk about suicide and that there may be someone who can help.

What are the warning signs of suicide risk? What should you look out for?


I have put together an infographic below which outlines some of the risk factors for teen suicide, some of the warning signs for suicide, places you can find help and also some information on coping with loss if you have found this page because of the death of a loved one. The end of the infographic includes a remembrance poem for those already passed.


Teenage suicide - risk factors and warning signs - an infographic:


an infographic with risk factors for teenage suicide, warning signs of teen suicide, coping with loss, where to get help


"The rest of those before us cannot settle the unrest of those to follow..."

Sarah x

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21 comments:

  1. Tough to talk about but so important that we do. It's a great infographic, am sure it will help many. There's a great charity called The Ollie Foundation who are doing good training in this area. Thinking of you and all your family x

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    1. Thanks Steph, I shall check them out - such an important issue and good to hear of helpful organisations who are trying to make a difference x

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  2. I'm so sorry to hear about your loss.
    Thank you though for sharing this. I have had issues with my eldest, who is 14, with him mentioning suicide to the school counsellor. I am thankful that he has a caring friend who took him to the counsellor to talk and that she in turn spoke to me. I had no idea how he was feeling. Thankfully this was a little while ago and he has improved since. I make an extra effort with him to talk about stuff and I hope it is working.
    Such an important issue. Thank you again.

    Thinking of you and your family.
    #ablogginggoodtime

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    1. Wow, well done to that friend! And so good to hear that you have the channels of communication open - it’s such a difficult age. Really hope your son keeps feeling better xx

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  3. Such an important post. So very sad for your friend, what a tragic loss. #ABloggingGoodTime

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  4. Sorry to hear of yours and your friends loss. Such an important topic to raise awareness of #ABLoggingGoodTime

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  5. Thank you for raising awareness on such an important topic that a lot of us don't know enough about. Knowledge is power #ablogginggoodtime

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  6. Such terrible statistics. with 5 teenagers currently I am very aware of the risks and it is frightening #KCACOLS

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  7. I'm sorry for your loss. I think that often times this is something that too many are afraid to consider and never think might affect them. Great post on an important topic that needs more discussion. Pinned to several boards #kcacols

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  8. I think as a parent it's really hard to see. You can be laughing and joking, the kid can be 'successful' and popular and then suddenly you find out all is not what it seems. I read that just being asked 'Are you thinking about suicide?' can actually make them feel better, as it makes them feel less alone, or that what they're thinking is ok (not ok to do, okay to think and talk about). I also read somewhere that what you can say is 'Maybe you won't feel this way tomorrow' (not it will be better or things will change, cos maybe they won't; but maybe YOU won't FEEL this way.). In Australia our stats are so terrible and continue well into adulthood. Everyone under 60 will be personally touched by suicide, and if you are under 35 you are more likely to die at your own hand than any other cause of death. We have a real problem in this country, and it's alarming how little we are doing about it. #KCACOLS

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  9. Mental health is a huge taboo subject, even though there is a lot more knowledge of everything around it's still very much kept secret.

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  10. My daughter is 13 and my own mental health problems have had an affect on her. She struggles with anxiety. I am lucky in that she talks to me and her school are helping her with counselling and group sessions. More people need to be talking about mental health problems with teens as it is a big issue that needs highlighting.
    #KCACOLS

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  11. Sometimes there are no signs. There needs to be more investment in CAMHS. #kcacols

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  12. Wow. This one was hard for me to read and I don't really know what to say. I tried to commit suicide when I was 15 years old. I shared my story on my blog in September for National Suicide Prevention Month. #KCACOLS

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  13. I also made sure to follow you on all social media. Thanks for sharing! #KCACOLS

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  14. Also linking up with #KCACOLS. It is such a big topic at the moment too. Sharing again x

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  15. Gosh, this must have been a hard post to write - I am so sorry for your family's loss. I suffer quite badly from depression so this post struck a chord with me. #KCACOLS

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  16. I’m so sorry you lost someone. Now this is something that many of us should be made aware of so th k you for being brave and sharing. Thank you for linking up with us for #kcacols and we hope to see you next time.

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  17. So sorry to read this and thank you so much for sharing. I have a teenage daughter and I haven't a clue what to look out for <3 I do now #KCACOLS

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  18. So sorry for your loss, this is an incredibly informative post - thank you for sharing #KCACOLS
    Sarah | Mummykind
    www.mummykind.com

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